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and northern. >> sure. that's a great question so right now our biggest overweight is in germany, and reason being is all of europe is cheap in different degrees, but germany, when you set monetary policy for the weak link, clearly the southern half of euro, the strong get stronger, and i don't think anyone would disagree that economically speaking germany's in the strongest position of anyone in the eurozone. also, you know, through my background as a bottoms up analyst, for many years, when i look bottoms up at the german index, what i find are terrific companies that compete globally. that's not everywhere in europe, but germany has a lot. the auto sector, chemicals, health care sector, and financials in germany, not so much deutsche bank, but world class companies and world class management teams gives me confidence germany is positioned to do well even within europe. david: chris, we got to run, but quickly, is apple a screaming buy at the prices? >> i think it is. obviously, i'm in the minority recently, but i think investors -- depends if you're a trader, who knows what's going to hap
warned of a possible recession in germany. central bank cutting its growth forecast for the eurozone's biggest economy and that expects growth to reach just 0.4% in 2013. a big cut from previous forecasts of 1% and 1.6%. there's also no political crisis in italy by the way. support has been withdrawn for the group run by monti. berlusconi hinted he may return to politics after stepping down last year. claudia joins us in milan. a number of reports suggested this may not upset investors too much just because we were going to have elections anyway, it doesn't bring it forward a lot earlier. is that the sense that you're getting? >> yes, it doesn't really change in terms of the timing. it just gives you an idea, though, of where berlusconi stands and what the situation is like within that central right next. the pdl has made it clear that there is a serious disagreement within the party. they were set to go forward with some primaries which is what the center left did to elect their candidate. and now that berlusconi has abruptly announced that he's going back, that tells you there is a
markets incidentally, too. bond markets, the fixed income markets, here we're seeing buying in germany at the moment and 10-year german bund around 3%. a little bit of buying into the gild as well as some of the safe haven trades back on. we have this italian bond auction. the first one is going to be settled in 2013 and the last one in this year, as well. it's thought that it is going to see solid demand given that it hasn't gotten any trouble getting off the ground as of late with those bond auctions, as well. a quick wrap on the forex market. here you're looking at selling in the euro/dollar right now. 1.3190. we're flirting with the high level of this trading range that we've been stuck in. dollar/yen, it's thought when this new japanese government coming into place, they're simulating the economy and to make sure a weaker yen is in place, as well. kelly. >> louisa, thanks. we're keeping an eye on gold today. could the precious metal be losing its luster come 2013? we'll find out why kuts has decided to cut exposure to the precious metal for the first time. >>> hello, everybody. we
. among those closed include spain and germany. we're start with asia. shanghai composite is the outperformer. you saw up 1.6% there. here is a list of the markets closed across europe. germany, switzerland, germany and austria. for the bourses that are open, we can take a look at performance this morning and then we'll take a look over at the bond wall. the ftse 100 is down about .4%. ibex down .5%. not a clear picture. definitely mixed trade as people look to close out the year. the bond wall gives the sense for what kind of wall dominates. we're seeing bond yields move higher. investors are exiting the asset class today. italy around the 4.5% level. we've seen these predominant for several weeks and likely a quick check on forrus. the yen, an important one to keep an eye on, as well. dollar/yen firmer, continuing the patterns that we've seen over the last couple of trading sessions. for more on what to expect from markets today, we're joined by chris meyer, managing director and chief strategist from loop capital markets. chris, good morning. we wake up without a deal.
processing firms are leading the recovery. >>> and germany's latest exports seems to be recession proof. it's a tradition dating back to the middle ages, but germany's christmas markets are more popular than ever. nbc's andy eckh artson sends this report. >> every december, music rix out across girlny's favorite christmas market. berlin alone hosts more than 80 markets, each with its own character where the sights, sounds and smells of christmas combine to keep your financial crisis at bay. >> we don't feel a crisis. when you look around here at the christmas market, you meet so different people from germany and it's so popular to come to berlin. christmas season is present season. >> over the past 20 years, germany's christmas markets have become a big attraction and big business. analysts estimate that the german christmas market industry brings in billions of dollars annually. for many small businesses and traditional craftsmen, the markets are the main source of income for the year. makia, one of only ten mammoth ivory carvers in germany has seen his annual turnover grow since 2003. eve
, as opposed to adam lan za and what triggers this. think of germany, germany in the last three year has had three mass shootings, and they've had the strictest gun control laws in the world. including psychological profiling. and 2011, czech republic, nearby germany, has very lax gun control, they have not had this type shooting. >> so there's nothing we can do? we need to be complacent in the fact that we can send our children to school to be assassinated? >> no, i think that one of the problems we have on the gun control debate is it immediately starts dividing people into, you disagree with me, therefore, you're the enemy. i've opened up saying let's put gun issues on the table. let's include mental health. video games, home back ground in there. and i think where there is common ground, you could say the storage of weapons. but when we immediately start saying, well, you want this, therefore you dislike children or whatever, it's not productive to the debate. and i want to point out, i've been in congress for a long time, i can tell you, gun control debates are very, very difficult. and
are as different as germany and greece. what is it that keeps the united states together? you had a great depression here in the 1930's. things were awful. and yet, i do not believe there were any political movements to get rid of the deficit states from the united states, like there are in europe and portugal and spain and everywhere else that happens to be in deficit. the reason is, the federal- state, especially after 1929 plays the role of the regulator of surplus and deficit recycling around the land. let me give you a simple example. we are in seattle. boeing is sponsoring the lectures. when boeing goes to washington to give a contract for the next generation jet or whatever, they may get it. they do get it. but there are some things attached. like for instance, we want a factory that builds the wings are the engines in tennessee or missouri or arizona. in the deficit regions. this is not philanthropy. this is an act of recycling surplus so the surpluses of the surplus state can continue to be created, produced. you may recall that in the 1920s, internationally, we had a gold stand
. an agreement still seems pretty elusive at this moment. germany and french finance ministers have very different views about oversight of banks. and in britain, the chancellor george osbourne delivers his statement to parliament today. will be out in westminster soon. steve is out to give us more detailed analysis of what to expect. let's just go back to the eurozone. as you say, thin advances here. are we capping -- it's up against the yen as well. there's obviously been a big yen story. >> yeah, i think the euro/yen has had perhaps more to do with eu euro/dollar than anything else. the euro crosses in general have been story rather than euro/dollar and euro/yen at the forefront. i think the euro/yen forecast is overplayed in what japan will ultimately deliver on. but mum is pretty good. i think you still play for a little yen weakness. i think we'll see a lot of people trying to buy yen back because i don't think we'll get delivery in all these preelection promises. >> do we all think we know what the chancellor is going to say? >> judging by the many pages being given to it in the n
won't do particularly well, but germany and italy maybe next year have a potential surprise on the upside. >> how much of a surprise? >> it will not be a fast recovery. the ecb will be forced to do more, but they'll be drald dragged into it. so things will have to get worse before they act. so i don't really think -- >> what more actions? they have a t program waiting to go. what more actions are you talking about? >> the key policy rate for the ecb is likely indeed in the first quarter. they can take dpopt deposit rate negative. by the middle of next year, they'll be doing outright qe. i've been talking about this for ages. they haven't done it so maybe they won't do it. but i'm assuming that the outlook for inflation for the eurozone is -- >> how are they going to get around -- look, i know the bundes bank has a fear of hyper inflation. i just don't -- are they going to get around all the -- because even if they do it on the inflation mandate, are they going to get around the objections about outright money printing? germans would see it as that. >> they would see it as ou
and the support groups and we proceeded to attack across into germany. >> there's much more to the story. next, the images he will never be able to forget. >>> 71 years ago following the bombing of pearl harbor, the u.s. entered world war ii. they then moveded into germany and witnessed firsthand horrors of the haolocaust. you're about to see stark images of the war, sights that waitzman say still live with him to this very day. >> our first contact is what we call the holocaust. there was a city of dinslaken. we were greeted with thousands of dead bodies. it was conveyed to us later that the germans poured gasoline on people and burn them alive. we went to nordhausen. we went to this camp. after neutralizing their fire and lowering down the gates, we were again greeted by thousands of dead bodies. we came to a crematorium area. there were 10 or 12 ovens in that camp. most of them the doors were very hot. we got them open, found bones and ashes. we had no idea what to do for these poor people. we gave them sips of water and to not try to do anything else. the medical detachment got there short
shootings in world history. in fact, they both occurred over the last decade was in germany. germany has extremely strict begun control laws. people talk about bans on semiautomatic weapons. you have to undergo two psychological screening tests. both the examples given -- >> i understand. i think everything should be on the table. i don't have a gun, i don't have a bushmaster, i don't know why someone needs 30 rounds necessarily in a magazine, if you're gougt and hunting deer. you make the point these are hunting guns made to look like military guns but they don't have the features of military guns, is that your point? >> that's right. they ban guns based upon how they look, rather than how they function. semiautomatics, one pull of the trig, one bullet comes out. semiautomatics do lots of harm. but the problem is we have to realize that has both costs and benefits. we see the costs here but the benefits are let's say you were attacked by two criminals. would you want to have a gun where you had to manually load the bullets in? if you had a rifle had the pull the bolt back, you may not h
in germany or alabama. want them in lexington, kentucky or china? >> you mentioned germany. volkswagen opened a plant in chattanooga a few months ago, 2,000 new jobs. bob corcoran was down there. 2,000 jobs, every one of which started at $14.50 an hour. >> right. they're not all going to be at -- >> so volkswagen was moving these jobs here because we're the low wage country compared to germany. >> dude, are you suggesting we push these jobs away? >> i'm not. >> i would rather americans have a shot at a $17 an hour job than having it in china. >> i agree. >> find a way to do better. i actually agree with you. but you have to understand the consequences are pretty severe for american lifestyles. >> again, though, i'm sorry, mike, but the consequences are, we have two choices, we can't get 1965 wages, we either have these jobs in china or lexington, either have them in alabama or germany and this is at least for some of -- a chance for younger americans to get some good jobs. >> joe, if you're taking a job that pays $14.50 an hour. it means one of two things, a, you don't have a job so you're ge
, 1.63. and bond yields higher. they got kicked higher in germany post that survey which we broke on the show, as well. as far as the currency market, dollar bit under pressure ahead of the fed. euro/dollar 130.08. we were down late friday and early monday trade, as well. dollar/yen, highs polls suggest mr. erbe will be a clear win in japan. however big will the lead be and what influence tell have on the bank of japan. dollar and yen pressured by more q.e. talk. and aussillar three-month high. the prospect of q.e. boosting commodityets. canadian doing well. firm at 1.6122. we have more on the asian trading day out of singapore. >> reporter: hi, thank you, ross. most asian markets finished on a bright note. the shanghai composite recouped morning losses in positive territory. property stocks turned higher in the afternoon. stocks also rallied while investors await beijing's detailed plan on urban development. strengthening main line blue chips pushed the hang seng to a 16-month high. developers, industrials, and gaming stocks among the top gamers today. >>> in japan the country's
for germany, which is a positive and will be a good gain forward. but say order box, very weak. demand, very weak. business confidence very weak and this is going to be hitting activity indicators going forward. >> even though the manufacturing side of it disappointed, the services was stronger. while services is a big part of the economy, it's where we're trying to see the rebalancing in the german economy happen. from that point of view, probably a rather encouraging development. >> it is interesting. it's also very exportwise. what we saw on these numbers was german exports falling sharply again. and this is just signaling that global economic conditions, soft patch very weak, particularly for the region -- i'm sorry, within the eurozone itself. >> and it's consistent with the weakening global demand we're seeing out of japan and other areas this morning. but it's not necessarily -- if you look at the details of what this is telling us across the globe, frankly a point to deceleration in activities. >> and maybe the global economy will continue to expand. they will signal that china is co
? >> chuck hagel was not to go to vietnam. he had orders to go to germany. he was at fort dix. he said i want to go to vietnam. in may and talk to the chaplain and psychologist, and after two weeks, he went to vietnam. he fought for his country, unlike his critics. he has bled for his country, unlike his critics. he understand war, unlike his critics. he did not have other priorities, like richard cheney, and never said it was going to be a cakewalk. he is prepared, ready, and bill cohen put it best. he has fought and bled for this country. he knows the subject matter. ask jim jones and other national security advisers. >> iraq and iran, that is what upsets people about shock hegel and some of the things he had to say about them. >> he was a supporter of the war in iraq. he supported the war in afghanistan. he voted in favor. it is an odd dove. all the critics are now decrying that he supported these wars. now when it came time to redeem what is it pay losing war in iraq with the troop surge, he not only opposed it, he said it would be the worst disaster since the vietnam war, but it was a su
in jellyfish, impact life expectancy in the u.s., real estate in hong kong, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >>> how about one last look at the accuweather day forecast. thursday will be active at night. we're going to have rain coming through. it will change to snow in the mountains. winter storm watches flying this. bring on the cold stuff for the end of the week and into christmas. >> thank you sue and thank you for joining us. now you have the news edge. we'll see you back here tomorrow night. have a good evening, everyone.   
to germany. he was at fort d, new jersey and said i wanted to go to vietnam. they made him talk to the chaplain and pchologist. after two weeks, he went to vietnam. he has fought for his countntry unlike his critics. he has bled for his country unlike his critics. hehe understands war, unlike hisis critics. he does not have other incentives like dick cheney. he is prepared and r ready. bill cohen said it best. he has fought and bled for thisis country. he knows the subject matter. ask jim jones and other national securitydvisers. >> iraq and iran, that is what upsets people about huck hagel. >> he supported the war in iraq, voted in favor, and supported the war in afghanistan. it is an odd de that supported the two were that all the critics are now crying. he also, when it camtime to dean what was a losing war in iraq with the surge, he not only opopposed it he said it would be the worst disaster since the vinam war, and it was actually a success. >> he has other problems thate will have to address. references that heade to gays, he will have to talk about the reference to the j
was not to go to vietnam. he had orders to go to germany. he was at fort dix, new jersey and said i wanted to go to vietnam. in may and talk to the chaplain and psychologist and after two weeks, went to vietnam. he has fought for his country, unlike his critics. he has but pours countries, unlike his critics. he understands war, unlike his critics. he does not have other priorities, as richard cheney did at the same time in vietnam. he never said it was going to be a cakewalk. he is prepared, ready, and bill, and put it best. he has fought for his country and but for his country. he knows the subject matter. ask jim jones and other national security advisers. >> two words, iraq and have -- iran. that is what upsets people about chuck a calamity had to say about those two. >> he supported the war in iraq, voted in favor and supported the war in afghanistan and is an odd dove that supported the two wars and all the critics are now decrying. he also, when it came time to redeem what was a losing war in iraq with the troop surge, he not only opposed it, he said it would be the worst disaster since t
, and there are schools in asia and south korea, germany, where the school is all year and germany towns out a lot of pretty neat engineers and, of course, much of asia turns out a lost great technology types and the rest, so they are getting bang for the education buck. your fear is it would not be copied here? >>guest: no. the trouble is, you have other countries. in finland, they focus on only putting the proper people to have the highest success in the classroom or potential for success in the classroom in education schools. so they don't just let anyone in a school education. >>neil: they look at promising students. you could be a late bloomer and get passed up. >>guest: that is possible. but, instead, what they are doing is scrutinizing people prior to getting into the system. what we do in america, unfortunately, according to international studies, we have students who are graduating to become teachers are in the bottom third of their graduating class. so we are putting people in choose rooms that are not equipped with skills. they do not have the ability to handle a classroom. so what we n
proceeded to attack and cross into germany. >> much more to the story. next, the images he will never be able to forget. fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. i wish my patients could see what i see. ♪ that over time, having high cholesterol and any of these risk factors can put them at increased risk for plaque buildup in their arteries. so it's even more important to lower their cholesterol, and that's why, when diet and exercise alone aren't enough, i prescribe crestor. in a clinical trial versus lipitor, crestor got more high-risk patients' bad cholesterol to a goal of under 100. [ female announcer ] crestor is not right for everyone. like people with liver disease or women who are nursing, pregnant or may become pregnant. tell your doctor about other medicines you're taking. call your doctor right away if you have muscle pain or weakness, fee
, not made in germany, not made in china, not made in the u.s. made in the world. 60% of trading manufacturers is in some -- the import content of exports at rate worldwide was 20% years ago, is 40% now and might be 60% 20 years from now. so it's a totally different world from the one many people have in mind where, you know, your country was producing country which my country was consuming and this was a sort of relationship, hands, export this, import that. in this world, the global value changes. you need to import in order to export and use your competitive advantage. so it's a different pattern and i think this has consequences which most governments have, i think, not yet really realized, which is why we've launched this initiative together with the oecd to sort of measure trading at a value and we will probably be unveiling the first batch of trade in value added numbers mid january. our statistical missions are working extremely hard. these guys won't have a great christmas break, but i think that will look very, very, very difference from what we have today. >> just in t
is these countries, mainly germany to bail the rest of europe out. germany has balked at that quite a bit. merkel has an election coming up soon. i don't think you'll see germany doing a lot of bailing out the rest of europe. and europe is the number one global concern to this day. if europe doesn't do well, the rest of the world economy is going to suffer. >> gregg: what about japan? is it insolvent already? >> yeah. a lot of people believe so. that will be a big story in 2014. just recently japan announced that they are going to start printed ago lot of money and last week, you saw the yen drop in value 15% which means that, if what we are company exporting to japan that just hurts our sales quite a bit because the value of their yen is less. so not able to buy as many products which is then, gregg, to hurt our stock market because a lot of our growth comes outside our borders of the united states. this is is a problem that goes directly to nks 401-k plan. >> then there is china which is the growth juggernaut but it accelerated? >> in fact the beginning of the year they are looking at double-digit
morning. all right. coming up new at 10, germany's chancellor angela merkel says europe will have to work very hard to it maintain its current standard of living. at the top of the hour, find out what she's saying about welfare and here is another development from overseas. we brought you the story last week, french actor gerard depardu, he is leaving home, leaving france because of higher taxes and handed in his passport. now, the french prime minister has some choice words for mr. depardu. he's obviously in the happy with him and find out exactly what he said at ten o'clock eastern time this morning. time is money. 30 seconds, here is what else we've got for you, an in japan, again, a landslide win, so, what's the new prime minister going to do about the world's worst debt problem? print more money and stimulate more, too. build more infrastructure. will that work? we have our own resident japan expert. question, is jeff immelt's cozy relationship with the president costing general electric shareholders money? we will be discussing it. and i lost on friday when i questioned "the washing
's a union story that tells something about the rebalancing in the eurozone. potentially germany. we know with the xetera dax up .3%. and almost 30% this year. investors see if the euro project hangs together, it's going to mean renation in germany. that is some wage inflation, some price inflation. the public sector union verde, powerful union, along with some others with its contract up at the end of the year is asking, guys, for a 6.5% pay rise next year. it got about 2.5% for the last couple of years. it is on the public sector side but also an example of what kind of pay hikes we may see flowing through to the german economy. if that helps support spending, despite weak industrial production figures and concern about growth prospects, there may be some rebalancing toward the german consumer taking on more of the heavy lifting across the eurozone. so one to keep an eye on, guys. >> thank you very much. we shouldn't see that as the unions pressuring -- they probably are pressuring for higher wages, but there's been pressure on germany to drive more inflation in germany to help lift the
of the most successful year over year appreciations of any developed country's equity markets? >> germany. >> bingo. i think of their own currency it's up like 30%. let's keep going. >> okay. so germany has been the engine of european growth. if germany slows down, the dynamic in europe is going to change dramatically. if this euro/yen goes through let's say 120, 125, 130 which is what they're pushing for, the german auto sector which has made great inroads against the japanese because the euro/yen as the japanese have held the yen has been over valued that is going to change the whole european dynamic. a slowing germany will become a wild card. that's my call for the biggest wild card in 2013. >> i tell you what. you have to go nose to nose with a country on the foreign exchange front, i think the japanese are going to be well matched with the mentality of what is going on in germany. listen, merry christmas. i know hannukah is over and you had a great hannukah. >> thank you. >> best holiday wishes to all the viewership from two old time traders. back to you. >> two of the best that is.
the united kingdom, france, germany, china, russia has ratified it. now you can pass anything in the senate with 60 votes. except treaties which require 66. a two-thirds majority. every democrat voted for the treaty and only eight republicans voted for the treaty. 38 republicans disgraced themselves and disgraced the senate. by voting against it and controlling the outcome. john kerry tried everything he could on the senate floor to show republicans the way to vote for this treaty. >> it really isn't controversial. what this treaty says is very simple. it just says that you can't discriminate against the disabled. it says that other countries have to do what we did 22 years ago when we set the example for the world and passed the americans with disabilities act. >> the treaty was supported by organizations representing people with disabilities and veterans groups but that was not good enough for 38 republicans. it was supported by senator john mccain, himself a disabled veteran. >> bob dole has been our leader on the issue of disabilities from the moment he stepped foot into the chamber. to
and basketball teams. they often use sporting venues to fight. >>> germany. eight people died including four children when two small planes collided mid air. police say the crash happened as darkness fell over a town about an hour north of frankfurt. the two aircraft crashed into fields about 1200 feet apart. no word on the cause. >>> serbia. at least two people died as heavy snowfall and below freezing temperatures hit the north. authorities say the harsh conditions also snarled traffic for some 17 hours. local media report crews rescued more than 600 people from their cars. similar weather slammed neighboring countries in the balkans. >>> china. a 16-year-old from japan became the youngest winner of the world snowboard championships air and style event in beijing. the teee of the sport's most difficult tricks to clinch the title. he also set a new record for the longest time in the air. that's a wrap on this fox around the world in 80 seconds. >>> software giant john mcafee. is he crazy? is he a pathological liar? is he a murder or maybe all of them? the software mogul said he's on the run
germany, italy, england, and austria from staalin and his successors even though they are now strong enough to meet a threat which in fact doesn't exist. i just had my very able aid marcus rose check this for me. over the last ten years we have spent $3.8 billion in medicare. that's true. during that same period we spent $5.6 billion on the military. the military has been going up fast faster and it includes an awful lot of expenditure, unnecessary. we're reading today that canada is recoring whether they're going to buy the f-35. the f-35 is a very, very well conceived airplane that's proving to be a great financial disaster. if any agency, the decht housing, the department of education, the department of energy, had a disaster as remotely expensive to the taxpayer as the f-35 my conservative friends would be screaming. so yeah, i agree with them. ironically. that's one area where the republicans want to spend more, where mitt romney criticizes the president for not spending enough. and i'm very encouraged, ed, that in this last election for the first time in my memory a democratic
estate in hong kong, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. executor of efficiency. you can spot an amateur from a mile away... while going shoeless and metal-free in seconds. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle...and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. now this...will work. [ male announcer ] just like you, business pro. just like you. go national. go like a pro. >>> welcome back. if today's market action is any suggestion of what's to come, where do you put your money now? >> where do you put your money in the final five trading days of the year? >> well, i think you want to position yourself for growth, for global growth. the u.s. is slowing, so you wan
, then why are gun deaths in every other industrialized nation, including canada, germany, great britain, japan, france-- why are their gun deaths so much lower than ourselves? i mean, john howard, a very conservative prime minister-- former prime minister of australia said we don't want the american disease in australia. why is it that all these other countries don't seem to have this problem? >> well, they have soo they have a homicide problem. they have a violent crime problem. in britain, it's four times what ours is. they don't have as many guns. that doesn't prevent killing. it doesn't prevent mayhem. it doesn't prevent violent crime. >> schieffer: you don't really believe people armed with baseball pats batcan somehow kill more people than people armed with guns. >> in this country, more people are beaten to death than are killed by long guns. >> schieffer: the people who are surviving gunshot wounds now, it's because we have better medical help, david, for the same reason-- >> that's good. >> schieffer: yes, it's good. it's the same reason more of our people are surviving on the
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. we believe that the recession in europe is both broadening to countries like germany and deepening in the countries where there are already roadway sessions and, in-- already recessions and, indeed, depression. greece and spain. liz: jeff looks like he's about to damage you. go ahead, jeff. >> are well, you know, they're going to make a deal in washington. i lived inside the beltway, have a pretty good network inside the beltway. cantor is worried -- excuse me, not cantor, boehner is worried about not being reelected as speaker of the house. they can't vote on that until january 4th with the new congress on that. cantor wants that job. so i think boehner's going to press for a deal, i think he's going to go ahead and allow president obama to raise taxes to 39.6%, and i think that'll take the edge off the fiscal cliff. david: let's take this discussion out of the beltway and into the real world. the economy, and, jeff, i want to start with you because you're bullish, but if you're so bullish, hy are you downgrading housing right now? >> because our housing team made a really good c
on its last leg now? >> that's a good question. these are american units coming from places like germany and netherlands. i was surprised it might take the end of january. that's reason i said it was symbolic saying we're sporting them. who knows what will happen in syria over the next couple weeks or months or even before these batteries are in place. there could be certainly some problems due to the lack, this vulnerability they think is developing for turkish airspace and turkish sovereignty. adam: turkey is an ally. they are a member of nato. they have a strong army. syria, on the other hand, as we said, the rebels are aligned with islamic powers that may not be friendly to the united states. it sure looks as if this is, at least gives a open door, a foot, not a toe into turkey should we need to have a greater force on the border with syria. wouldn't that be a logical conclusion? >> that is something to think about but i don't think we're going there. i don't think this association is going there. adam, they have 20 months to do something. they have done basically nothing. they recen
leg up in competitiveness in the future. germany is not waiting. of course, it's an economic powerhouse and an export powerhouse. korea is doubling down, actually that a green-led economy is not only going to be the right thing for korea but it will put them in the global leadership of technology for decades to come. i think you're right. this is so foolish to wait to have a 20th century energy system in the 21st century. they'rethose moving ahead will do themselves a commercial benefit. technology is moving forward. we're not there yet where we can simply outcompete dirty coal, for example when dirty coal does not have to pay the full the full freight of the damage does it does. soler and wind that challenges new technologies. >> jennifer: let me interrupt you for just a minute. i know we're running out of time, but i want to talk to you about this. this week right now, have you heard anything promising in this last minute what do you expect will come out of those talks? >> look, the world is on a track of lease common denominator and in no small part due to the united state
there really divergent from the rest of europe. germany up on the right, a good gain up over 1%, the italian market falls by 1%. silvio berlusconi is back in italian politics proving he still runs his party and withdrawing support from mario monti. this may lead to midterm elections because monti is market friendly you might not end up with a market friendly solution. we thought we'd have elections march/april, there's the prospect it could be a snap election much earlier perhaps in the new year. now the good news is there isn't a huge amount of blowout on the bonds at the short end of the italian markets. the yields are higher but not huge relative to where we've been but on the ten-year italian market you can see we're slightly higher but no great shakes overall. it means the rally in the peripheral bond market we've witnessed in italy and spain has now stalled at this stage. remember we had the auction in spain yesterday and the yields are slightly higher relative to where we've been, they're still relatively depressed. we talk about the problems in europe, i thought it was worth pointing
. germany can affo to bailout greece. nobody can afford to bailout the united states, and i would agree actually th bill archer that i think he understated. if you take the total debt situation, you're talking about just shy of three-quarters of a million dollars for the -- per american family. so you get a cup of coffee from a waitress in the diner, think of loading three-quarters of a million dollars of debt on to her shoulders for what? for what? does nothing to show for. lou: her children and their children that will be paying a large measure of that. great to have you with us. making spirits bright. and after america with one of the ugliest pictures of an american cadaver toe tag to. >> doom and the oven is the into debt. lou: at least some balance here. you know how much are presidenta taxes on our middle-class. >> the bill is passed. lou: the house passes the stem emigration bill. some democrats call it racist and pandering. how is that? and republicans also introduced the achieve act. other republicans taking the lead on emigration reforms? ♪ lou: in "lou dobbs forum" we will
to see his mother-in-law in germany before her open heart surgery. >> gg
of 8 months to the next federal election in germany, for instance. greece therefore is the sick person europe. of the world. meanwhile, the united states of america is ungovernable. you have a system in this country that was created to create this country as an ungovernable state. you have congress, the president canceling each other out. how the president -- whoever the president might be -- do anything? you have china -- finding it impossible to provide a replacement for the demand that the west has done away with. so, i do not have an answer for your question. bewilderment. >> my question is about consumer demand and the extent to which the old system depended on it. if we do not have it to the same degree, could there possibly be a new economy? i cannot know how to say all of these in the right economic terms. i will say what i am thinking and see what you make out of it. its teams like all the economy's got to a point where it had to be based on growth. it could not just be sustainable. it had to grow. and that meant more consumers. so, then, that led to a lot of things ecological
. forget it, the hell with it. >> i was in munich, germany, this week, talking with business executives, the germans thought we were crazy. only people not watching this charade in u.s. is the french, they are looking to get out of france because of the tax rate there. the they said only thing france will export in 21 century are millionaires. neil: they all go to belgium, it is obviously for more than just the chocolate. so, where do we stand? the markets have been nearly, if not dismissively going by all this and through all this, assuming i think that a teal would be had -- a deal would be had. tomorrow it looks like a deal will not be had, the they -- mas have turned sharply lower, 74 down in the futures. i am wondering, if that is a signal they could worry this is not a fore gone conclusion, we could go into the new year with no deal. >> i'm thinking, increasingly, that sequestration and going into the new year without a deal is the best possible thing for the u.s., it is the only way you will see spending decreases. you will get revenue increase on top. but hopefully, they will be
by better than seven points and the nasdaq futures up, as well, by about 17. european shares rising. germany is up, the ftse is up, the france, the cac in france has turned slightly down. but, again, this is a marginal loss of about three points. most of the major asian stock markets were higher overnight. and among the catalyst here, signs that china's recovery is gaining traction. sources say that the bank of japan will ease monetary policy this week and consider adopting a 2% inflation target no later than january. policymakers are seen responding to pressure from the incoming prime minister there. shinzo abe for stronger efforts to beat deflation. in the meantime, india's central bank kept interest rates on hold yesterday ignoring pressure to reduce borrowing costs. policymakers said they were shifting the focus to reducing the economy and that raises the odds of a rate cut as early as january. andrew olson, over to you. >> ubs reportedly nearing a fine of up to $1.5 billion. the bank is close to finalizing a deal with regulators according to the financial times. about three dozen banker
call. asia was up 13. europe was up 12. adding employees to europe, france, germany, very strong. similar to what bill mcdermott has been saying. we are all so doom and gloom about europe, ellison's talking about it's a bright spot. >> what about germany today, up again for december, as we mentioned at the top of the show, above $1.33 a day. something's going on there. the big upgrade on greece. that's kind of strange, right? >> up four or five notches. >> i have to stand up for a second. $8. >> is it finally time? >> i want to click my heels, but these are soft reeboks. you wouldn't hear it. >> are we going to see that, finally, at last? >> the way people were coming on and saying it's going to zero. >> running for the exit. >> when was the euro dissolved and greece kicked out? what was the date? >> it happened just in reverse. >> it was overnight. >> we'll see. i can't believe 2013 will not hold a couple of moments where we go, ah. but it is amazing. nothing we can do. >> we're afraid spain is going to come -- spain was supposed to come to market. italy, oh, my, what happens wh
word the government in holland is sending patriot missiles to turkey following germany's lead, the dutch decision comes a day after germany agreed to send two patriot missile batteries and troops to turkey's southern border with syria. after nato's request. the country trying to prevent cross-border attacks against turkey after mortar rounds and shells have killed five people in turkey. shells that originated in syria. martha has more. martha: a lot of developments on this in the past several hours. international pressure is mounting against the assad regime in syria, amid fears they could use chemical weapons. there is evidence that they have loaded weapons with sarin gas. the u.s. defense secretary leon panetta issued this warning now to syria's leaders. watch this. >> there will be consequences if the assad regime makes a terrible mistake by using these chemical weapons on their own people. i'm not going to speculate or comment on what those potential consequences would be but i think it's fair enough to say that their use of those weapons would cross a red line for us. mar
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